Sunday, October 21, 2007

American Woodcock

Back from a winterizing stint at the cabin with Richard. Pull the dock and Bunky the pontoon boat out of the lake, et cetera. And other generalities, like Richard exacting revenge on the cribbage board.

The American Woodcock is a migratory bird. Like ducks and geese, they travel in groups, landing in favored areas overnight or for a few days. Unlike ducks or geese, they are remarkably difficult to see after they do and must know it. A common technique used by reseachers for capturing live woodcock for banding involves a good pointing dog and a net. The dog points and the bird is netted on the ground. I've been told that the bird usually flushes before the person with the net can find it.

Richard counting primary feathers. It is difficult to dead-on determine the age and sex of a woodcock. Counting from the tip of the wing, the twelfth to fifteenth primary feathers give good indications of a birds' age and sex. Take notes on tip banding and mottling symmetrics.

Post test reward!
The recipe for Woodcock Ramake:
Breast filets of woodcock are carefully cradled in onion or green pepper the way julie cuts them. Wrap in a half of strip of bacon. Fresh ground pepper, maybe seasoned salt. Everyone knows the grill works best, but the oven works too. Use medium to low cooking temps to keep the bacon from flaring.
This photo shows ramake made with woodcock and grouse. If this doesn't look good to eat, an air freshener will help with the greasy, humid mcdonalds aura in your car or house. If still no go, peta is always looking for people to strap bombs to.
Richard's yellow lab, Rowdy, shows that the old dogs know what the game is about.